Liberty Forged

the State has no money of its own, so it has no power of its own. ` Nock

Monetary Policy & One World Government

Posted by Jesse on November 26, 2008

Bank Closure Map

“We will not have any more crashes in our time.”
– John Maynard Keynes in 1927

“No Congress of the United States ever assembled, on surveying the state of the Union, has met with a more pleasing prospect than that which appears at the present time. In the domestic field there is tranquility and contentment…and the highest record of years of prosperity. In the foreign field there is peace, the goodwill which comes from mutual understanding.”
– Calvin Coolidge December 4, 1928

“There will be no interruption of our permanent prosperity.”
– Myron E. Forbes, President, Pierce Arrow Motor Car Co., January 12, 1928

“I cannot help but raise a dissenting voice to statements that we are living in a fool’s paradise, and that prosperity in this country must necessarily diminish and recede in the near future.”
– E. H. H. Simmons, President, New York Stock Exchange, January 12, 1929

“There may be a recession in stock prices, but not anything in the nature of a crash.”
– Irving Fisher, leading U.S. economist , New York Times, Sept. 5, 1929

“Unless we are to have a panic — which no one seriously believes, stocks have hit bottom.”
– R. W. McNeal, financial analyst in October 1929

“This crash is not going to have much effect on business.”
– Arthur Reynolds, Chairman of Continental Illinois Bank of Chicago, October 24, 1929

“I have no fear of another comparable decline.”
– Arthur W. Loasby (President of the Equitable Trust Company), quoted in NYT, Friday, October 25, 1929

“Hysteria has now disappeared from Wall Street.”
– The Times of London, November 2, 1929

“Financial storm definitely passed.”
– Bernard Baruch, cablegram to Winston Churchill, November 15, 1929

“I am convinced that through these measures we have reestablished confidence.”
Herbert Hoover, President of the United States, December 1929

“[1930 will be] a splendid employment year.”
– U.S. Dept. of Labor,
New Year’s Forecast, December 1929

“The spring of 1930 marks the end of a period of grave concern…American business is steadily coming back to a normal level of prosperity.”
– Julius Barnes, head of Hoover’s National Business Survey Conference, Mar 16, 1930

“While the crash only took place six months ago, I am convinced we have now passed through the worst — and with continued unity of effort we shall rapidly recover.”
– Herbert Hoover, President of the United States, May 1, 1930

“Gentleman, you have come sixty days too late. The depression is over.”
– Herbert Hoover, responding to a delegation requesting a public works program to help speed the recovery, June 1930

“…by May or June the spring recovery forecast in our letters of last December and November should clearly be apparent…”
– Harvard Economic Society May 17, 1930
“… irregular and conflicting movements of business should soon give way to a sustained recovery…”
June 28, 1930
“… the present depression has about spent its force…”
Aug 30, 1930
“We are now near the end of the declining phase of the depression.”
Nov 15, 1930
“Stabilization at [present] levels is clearly possible.”
Oct 31, 1931

“All safe deposit boxes in banks or financial institutions have been sealed… and may only be opened in the presence of an agent of the I.R.S.”
– President F.D. Roosevelt, 1933

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2 Responses to “Monetary Policy & One World Government”

  1. Viva la Keynes. Glad to see Frankenstein has been re-animated by Washington.

  2. Jesse said

    I am a bit concerned with what the world leaders have in store. this isn’t the 30’s, despite the similarities.

    i really wonder what kind of tricks they have up their sleeves.

    some of these guys seem way too confident. it’s not exactly a monarchy where the people can yell “off with their head!”

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