Liberty Forged

the State has no money of its own, so it has no power of its own. ` Nock

Posts Tagged ‘state’

Financial Crisis solved: Start Liquidating Federal Gov’t assets

Posted by Jesse on March 14, 2009

It’s called leading by example

A Forgotten Day and A Forgotten Country Harry Brown

In 1886 the federal debt was $1.40 per person (adjusted for inflation to dollars of 2002 value). In 2002 the federal debt was $21,564 per person.

Free to Plan A Secure Retirement Harry Browne

The federal government owns trillions of dollars worth of assets it doesn’t need and shouldn’t have. These include power companies, pipelines, idle military bases, business enterprises, over 400,000 buildings, oil and mineral rights, commodity reserves, and much more including 29% of all the land in the United States.

When the federal government is reduced to just its Constitutional functions, there will be no reason for it to continue hoarding those assets. They can be sold to the public, putting them in the hands of people who will use them more responsibly and more productively. And the sales will generate the money to clean up the financial mess the politicians have made.

Repudiating the National Debt Murray Rothbard

It is ridiculous for a citizen to be taxed by one arm of the federal government (the IRS), to pay interest and principal on debt owned by another agency of the federal government. It would save the taxpayer a great deal of money, and spare savings from further waste, to simply cancel that debt outright. The alleged debt is simply an accounting fiction that provides a mask over reality and furnishes a convenient means for mulcting the taxpayer.

Social Security, perhaps the most revered institution in the American polity, is also the greatest single racket. It’s simply a giant Ponzi scheme controlled by the federal government. But this reality is masked by the Social Security Administration’s purchase of government bonds, the Treasury then spending these funds on whatever it wishes. But the fact that the SSA has government bonds in its portfolio, and collects interest and payment from the American taxpayer, allows it to masquerade as a legitimate insurance business.

…This combination of repudiation and privatization would go a long way to reducing the tax burden, establishing fiscal soundness, and desocializing the United States.

In order to go this route, however, we first have to rid ourselves of the fallacious mindset that conflates public and private, and that treats government debt as if it were a productive contract between two legitimate property owners.

What is America Harry Browne

If you devote yourself to fighting against the latest political proposal, you may be wasting your time.

The growth of government is inevitable because the major issue has already been decided: there is no longer an America of tiny government, voluntary association, and the free market. So the only arguments now are over how the politicians will run our lives the Republican way or the Democratic way.

Our one hope is to persuade our fellow Americans that a return to the Bill of Rights could bring us much smaller government, much greater personal income, access to more low-cost products and services, and the freedom to live your own life as you think best not as the President or Congress wants.

Every battle is trivial compared to the fight to restore that unique America.

And don’t forget about the Fed

The Solution Murray Rothbard

To save our economy from destruction and from the eventual holocaust of run away inflation, we the people must take the money-supply function back from the government. Money is far too important to be left in the hands of bankers and of Establishment economists and financiers. To accomplish this goal, money must be returned to the market economy, with all monetary functions performed within the structure of the rights of private property and of the free-market economy.

Abolish the Fed Ron Paul

From the Great Depression, to the stagflation of the seventies, to the burst of the dotcom bubble last year, every economic downturn suffered by the country over the last 80 years can be traced to Federal Reserve policy. The Fed has followed a consistent policy of flooding the economy with easy money, leading to a misallocation of resources and an artificial “boom” followed by a recession or depression when the Fed-created bubble bursts.


Posted in Mine | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Radically hating the State

Posted by Jesse on March 9, 2009

Last on the Colbert Agenda was an author, I missed his name, but he mentioned Joseph Priestley. He made the claim that Priestley and others were very influential in the beginnings of the American nation, despite the fact its not exactly a household name.

In Rothbards Do you Hate the State? he credits Priestley among others of being radical in a true sense of the word.

Perhaps the word that best defines our distinction is “radical.” Radical in the sense of being in total, root-and-branch opposition to the existing political system and to the State itself. Radical in the sense of having integrated intellectual opposition to the State with a gut hatred of its pervasive and organized system of crime and injustice. Radical in the sense of a deep commitment to the spirit of liberty and anti-statism that integrates reason and emotion, heart and soul.

Furthermore, in contrast to what seems to be true nowadays, you don’t have to be an anarchist to be radical in our sense, just as you can be an anarchist while missing the radical spark. I can think of hardly a single limited governmentalist of the present day who is radical – a truly amazing phenomenon, when we think of our classical liberal forbears who were genuinely radical, who hated statism and the States of their day with a beautifully integrated passion: the Levellers, Patrick Henry, Tom Paine, Joseph Priestley, the Jacksonians, Richard Cobden, and on and on, a veritable roll call of the greats of the past. Tom Paine’s radical hatred of the State and statism was and is far more important to the cause of liberty than the fact that he never crossed the divide between laissez-faire and anarchism.

This in turn recalled a book I read last year: The Betrayal of the American Right. In Chapter 2 Rothbard mentions Priestley, among others. He says:

The conventional historical wisdom asserts that while the radical movements in America were indeed laissez-faire individualist before the Civil War, that afterwards, the laissez-fairists became conservatives, and the radical mantle then fell to groups more familiar to the modern Left: the Socialists and Populists. But this is a distortion of the truth. For it was elderly New England Brahmins, laissez-faire merchants and industrialists like Edward Atkinson, who had financed John Brown’s raid at Harper’s Ferry, who were the ones to leap in and oppose the U.S. imperialism of the Spanish-American War with all their might. No opposition to that war was more thoroughgoing than that of the laissez-faire economist and sociologist William Graham Sumner or than that of Atkinson who, as head of the Anti-Imperialist League, mailed antiwar pamphlets to American troops then engaged in conquering the Philippines. Atkinson’s pamphlets urged our troops to mutiny, and were consequently seized by the US postal authorities.

In taking this stand, Atkinson, Sumner and their colleagues were not being “sports”; they were following an antiwar, anti-imperialist tradition as old as classical liberalism itself. This was the tradition of Price, Priestley, and the late eighteenth-century British radicals that earned them repeated imprisonment by the British war machine; and of Richard Cobden, John Bright, and the laissez-faire Manchester School of the mid-nineteenth century. Cobden, in particular, had fearlessly denounced every war and every imperial maneuver of the British regime. We are now so used to thinking of opposition to imperialism as Marxian that this kind of movement seems almost inconceivable to us today.1

See the article on Mises.org

Posted in Mine | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Telling stories can be truthful.

Posted by Jesse on January 31, 2009

this video reminded me of this post by heather macintosh:

“fiction and non-fiction are only different techniques of story telling. for reasons i don’t really understand, fiction dances out of me….and non-fiction is wrenched out by the aching broken word i wake up to every morning.”…

“the theme of much of what i write, fiction as well as non-fiction, is the relationship between power and powerlessness, and the endless circular conflict we’re engaged in”

`arundhati roy

here’s the playlist for the documentary:

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=A6C7477A824CC094

Posted in *Take Action, america, anarcho capitalism, anarchy, antiwar, barack obama, collectivism, culture, economics, Education, free market, government, healthcare, international, iran, iraq, Libertarian, life, media, middle east, military, personal, philosophy, Politics, Rights, socialism, society, thoughts, Video, work, writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Ron Paul, 21% in N. Dakota, 25% in MT, 15% in MN

Posted by Jesse on February 5, 2008

Just thought I’d post it!!!

Thank you MPBN!!

ABC…what a bunch of…(I’d better be careful what I say…., wouldn’t want to come off as Politically Incorrect!!!)

For anyone who sees this post…Why do I have such contempt for ABC right now? Beyond the fact that they won’t display Ron Paul’s percentages as they report on the results for Super Tuesday (intentionally), I will give visual proof of their intention to keep Ron Paul our of the public spotlight. Why?

5cand_v3_080205_mwide.jpg

Posted in Current Events, economy, Education, free market, healthcare, Libertarian, Politics, republican, Ron Paul | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »